Question: Does The Popular Vote Even Matter?

Which president won by the largest margin?

In the midst of the Great Depression, incumbent Democratic President Franklin D.

Roosevelt defeated Republican Governor Alf Landon of Kansas.

Roosevelt won the highest share of the popular and electoral vote since the largely uncontested 1820 election..

Obama won 332 electoral votes and 51.1% of the popular vote compared to Romney’s 206 electoral votes and 47.2%.

Obama won a decisive victory over McCain, winning the Electoral College and the popular vote by a sizable margin, including states that had not voted for the Democratic presidential candidate since 1976 (North Carolina) and 1964 (Indiana and Virginia).

What are 3 major flaws in the electoral college?

Three criticisms of the College are made: It is “undemocratic;” It permits the election of a candidate who does not win the most votes; and. Its winner-takes-all approach cancels the votes of the losing candidates in each state.

Are Electoral College votes all or nothing?

Electoral votes are awarded on the basis of the popular vote in each state. Note that 48 out of the 50 States award Electoral votes on a winner-takes-all basis (as does the District of Columbia).

Which states are not winner take all?

Only two states, Nebraska and Maine, do not follow this winner-take-all method. In those states, electoral votes are proportionally allocated. Can a candidate win the electoral vote, but lose the popular vote?

Clinton won a plurality in the popular vote and a majority of the electoral vote, breaking a streak of three straight Republican victories.

However, the popular vote is not used to determine who is elected as the nation’s president or vice president. … This is because presidential elections are indirect elections; the votes cast on Election Day are not cast directly for a candidate, but for members of the Electoral College.

What are the 5 requirements to be president?

As directed by the Constitution, a presidential candidate must be a natural born citizen of the United States, a resident for 14 years, and 35 years of age or older.

What is the Iowa caucus and why is it important?

Unlike primary elections in most other U.S. states, where registered voters go to polling places to cast ballots, Iowans instead gather at local caucus meetings to discuss and vote on the candidates. … The Iowa caucuses used to be noteworthy as the first major contest of the United States presidential primary season.

Who was the president before Obama?

ListPresidentPrevious 241George H. W. BushOut of office42Bill ClintonState attorney general43George W. BushOut of office44Barack ObamaState legislator41 more rows

Why did they create the Electoral College?

The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. … Several weeks after the general election, electors from each state meet in their state capitals and cast their official vote for president and vice president.

Is the Electoral College in the Constitution?

Established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the Electoral College is the formal body which elects the President and Vice President of the United States.

Popular vote, in an indirect election, is the total number of votes received in the first-phase election, as opposed to the votes cast by those elected to take part in the final election.

Who has been the youngest president?

The youngest to become president by election was John F. Kennedy, who was 43 years, 236 days, at his inauguration. The oldest person to assume the presidency was Donald Trump, at the age of 70 years, 220 days, on Inauguration Day.

How is the electoral college chosen?

In the Electoral College system, each state gets a certain number of electors based on its total number of representatives in Congress. Each elector casts one electoral vote following the general election; there are a total of 538 electoral votes. The candidate that gets more than half (270) wins the election.